Diversifying your Audiences

I recently travelled up to Manchester Central Library to attend the equality and diversity training provided by The National Archives. The aim of the day was for delegates to have a further understanding of how we can promote equality and diversity in the workplace for both staff and users.  We started with the basic guidelines of the Equality Act 2010 and the nine characteristics that it protects. Many of us were unaware of the full extent of the Act and the different ways in which harassment was measured and understood. The day was a real eye opener to not only the scope of the Act but also the barriers we face in our workplaces in achieving greater diversity.

Manchester Central Library

Manchester Central Library

Manchester Central Library was closed for refurbishment in 2010 and reopened in March 2014 with an impressive new interior. Particularly striking was the central focus on archives as you enter the building. Rather than being hidden away, the Archives+ department took centre stage on the ground floor of the library. The interactive displays made archival material more accessible to people of all ages and told the story of the local area from different perspectives. It was refreshing to see such a large space dedicated to the promotion of archives as well as many partners, such as; BFI Mediatheque, University of Manchester and Manchester Metropolitan University, working together cohesively.

An example of an interactive which tells the story from the archives

Touch screen displays showing the diverse communities within Manchester

The training day consisted of workshops as well as presentations and each delegate was asked to consider how their own workplace can promote equality and diversity to a greater extent. A common issue that arose was that equality is normally discussed at a recruitment and HR level but not filtered down on a smaller departmental scale. As the job role of an archivist is expanding, professionals need to be increasingly aware of their audiences and the legal framework in which they are expected to operate. It is important to recognise that equality and diversity should be implemented in all aspects of work practices and not be a separate entity that is only considered on a higher administrative level.

Brainstorming ideas on how to promote E&D

Brainstorming ideas on how to promote E&D

Another interesting point of discussion was on the perceptions and definitions of diversity. The Equality Act 2010 encompasses so much more than just race and disability and it is important to have an understanding of all areas of the Act in order to truly determine what diversity means. After all, you cannot define a group of human beings simply by their appearance and you certainly should not judge them on what you see.

The centrepiece of the the Archives+ area

The centrepiece of the the Archives+ area

Manchester Central Library was the ideal venue for this training day as the diverse collection on display provided a more representative memory of Manchester rather than showcasing the experiences of a few. Kevin Bolton, Archives+ manager, discussed the changes in his collecting policies to fill the missing gaps within the community in order to achieve this broader and more realistic understanding of life in Manchester. Despite the Research Collections not being a local or family history collection, the issue of being representative and diverse still applies in terms of making our collection as accessible to our students as possible.

Thanks for reading.

Danielle Joyce

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